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Prepare yourselves for summer down under. The Astonishing Kingdom of Longleat will be transformed into a vibrant land of all things Aussie until 2nd SeptemberStrewth!

Longleat will welcome their new Australian residents for their first ever British summer – some adorable koalas! They’ve travelled as far as you can go before you start to come back and have made Koala Creek their home!

Each day will be bursting at the seams with antipodean activities and entertainment, honouring these marvelous marsupials.

A classic British summertime activity is complaining about the weather. But at Longleat, there’s guaranteed great weather, as they bring the seaside inside! The Longhouse has been transformed into an indoor beach; a sandy, urban utopia in the heart of Wiltshire – with deckchairs to lounge in, over 120 tonnes of sand to build castles in and Aussie-themed games for all the family to enjoy.

Grab a Piña colada flavour Koala Cooler and tuck into a basket of fish and chips as you experience the gnarly graffiti wall, and even get crafty yourself on the giant colouring wall.

You could even drop in and strike a pose on the surf‐style wobble boards, but don’t worry if you wipe‐out because as they say; a bad day surfing is better than a good day working!

The Main Square has been transformed into the outback, staging diverse and delightful daily performances. From high tempo dancing, to live didgeridoo music, all the way to astounding and acrobatic break dancing battles. Wow!

Experience the lively energy of the End of Day Hooroo as it swells through the park. The fabulous Hooroo will see all the day’s performers turn the Square into a vibrant spectacle of colour, music, dancing and excitement in an inspiring choreographed display. Guests are keenly invited to join the fun; clap, snap, wave and stomp your way to a climactic end to your day at Longleat.

An Australian Summer at Longleat

The long journey to Longleat

Longleat’s loveable new group of koalas (plus wombats – the koala’s closest relative!) arrive at the safari park following an epic 16000km journey from Adelaide, Australia

Koalas are considered ‘vulnerable to extinction’ under Aussie law, so the awesome marsupials were transferred to Longleat as part of an international breeding and awareness-building programme. 

The Koalas were given VIP treatment as they flew over from Cleland Wildlife Park in South Australia in a special Singapore Airlines Cargo aircraft. They were accompanied by a vet team plus keepers from Longleat and Cleland.

After touching down, the animals were collected by a fleet of safari vehicles and taken to Longleat for a health check before being released into their new home – Koala Creek!

About Koala Creek

Their spacious new enclosure, Koala Creek, is packed full of features. It includes a natural stream, climbing poles, naturally-themed indoor and outdoor habitats and a Koala Care unit.

Most importantly, though, there’s even over 4000 eucalyptus trees for them to munch on! That’s great news as these hungry creatures can crunch through up to 1kg of eucalyptus leaves every day

To find out some fab facts about koalas, click here!

Competition

We’re giving away an awesome family day pass to Longleat. Click here to enter!

Click here to find out more about this awesome event!

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